Archive for January, 2016

Top 5 Bodybuilding Supplements You’re Not Taking Yet

The next wave of bodybuilding supplements may help you adapt to stressors, recover more quickly, burn fat without stimulants, and much more. Here are 5 you need to know!

If you know me, you know that I’m all about the basics. I think that reinventing the wheel simply for the sake of being different is silly. I mean, I’ve certainly gone against the grain with much of the advice I’ve dispensed over the years, but it was usually because the “grain” was, well, stupid and unsupported by evidence.

So I always chuckle when supplement companies hype up their products with new, unproven ingredients. Who cares how novel something is if it doesn’t do jack? This is why I’ve always been big on creatine monohydrate, despite many “improved” novel forms. Monohydrate can saturate the muscle cell 100 percent—and the last time I checked, you can’t get better than 100 percent. Whey protein, BCAAs, fish oil, and a few others have never been improved on, no matter how hard the industry has tried.

But your stack doesn’t have to end there. In recent years, a few new supplements have been building up not only good reputations, but good evidence to support their effectiveness. Down the line, it wouldn’t surprise me in the least to see them skyrocket into mainstream popularity.

Here are my five picks for the best bodybuilding supplements you aren’t using—yet!

1

Ashwagandha

OK, so ashwagandha isn’t exactly “new.” This herb, which has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine, is what’s known as an adaptogen. Technically, that means it may help support a healthy stress response. In rodent models, it has been demonstrated to support relaxation and a sense of calmness.*1,2


JYM Alpha JYM

View Product

Universal Nutrition Animal Cuts

View Product

True GRIT Test Booster

View Product

You may be wondering why I’m giving so much attention to a supplement that has primarily been tested in rodents. Well, there’s new human data from a study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition that found supplementing with ashwagandha twice per day supported strength, muscle growth, and even reduced body fat.*3

More research will be needed to further explain how and why this occurs, but it appears that taking 300 milligrams twice per day may benefit strength and muscle gains. Even though research is still in its infancy regarding ashwagandha, this supplement has much more backing than some of the more popular ones on the market today.

2

Ursolic Acid

Ursolic acid is a phytochemical found in apple peels. Oral supplementation with up to 450 milligrams per day has been suggested to simultaneously support strength and decrease body fat in human subjects.4 There’s also data in rats suggesting that ursolic acid may reduce muscle loss during fasting.*5


S.A.N. CONQUEST 250

View Product

Labrada Ursolic Acid

View Product

Labrada Fat Buster

View Product

Sounds great, right? It definitely is, but ursolic acid has very low bioavailability, meaning it takes a lot of the supplement to get the job done, so to speak. Fortunately, minimal amounts are needed to provide benefit, which suggests oral supplementation may be useful for supporting strength gains and body compositon.*

3

Fucoxanthin

Fucoxanthin is a marine compound found in several types of brown seaweed. It’s not a stimulant, but it may have an effect on fat loss and the creation of new fat cells.6 Fucoxanthin seems to be stored in existing fat cells and appears to induce increased energy expenditure, possibly via increased thermogenesis, which is the creation of heat.7,8 Why should you care? The creation of heat requires calories, meaning there’s potentially an increase in calorie burning.

The thermogenic effect takes time, however, as fucoxanthin must accumulate in fat cells before it can exert its fat-burning effects, similar to how creatine must accumulate in muscle cells before is benefits can be optimized.


Garden Of Life FucoThin

View Product

SciVation Dialene

View Product

LiveLong Nutrition Fucoxanthin

View Product

So how significant are those benefits? One human study estimated that fucoxanthin increased metabolic rate in obese women by approximately 450 calories per day after 16 weeks of supplementation.8 This may be due to its ability to stimulate activity by the fat-oxidizing enzyme AMP kinase, and by increasing white fat’s levels of UCP1 (also known as “thermogenin”), a thermogenesis-inducing mitochondrial protein.9,10

That’s all a sciency way of saying that fucoxanthin could be a novel but effective way to reduce body fat that is not stimulant-based. Generally, it’s recommended you take fucoxanthin with dietary fat to enhance absorption.11 And remember, the effect of this compound isn’t acute; it could take numerous weeks, or even several months, to build up enough to make a significant difference.

4

Rhodiola rosea

Another adaptogen that’s been gaining popularity in recent years, Rhodiola’s benefits are derived from the fact that Rhodiola acts to fight fatigue and reduce the perception of fatigue, which supports enhanced physical and cognitive performance.12,13


Carbon by Layne Norton Prep

View Product

New Chapter Rhodiola Force 300

View Product

NOW Rhodiola

View Product

It has also been demonstrated to reduce the effects of stress and feelings of being “burned out,” and may enhance recovery from workouts.12* It appears the effect on fatigue is both acute and chronic, though the acute affect may only be seen in untrained people, whereas trained individuals may need more time.14

5

Tart cherry

Whether you like the taste of cherries or not, research suggests tart cherries deserve some consideration as an ergogenic aid. Specifically, an extract from a variety known as the Montmorency tart cherry has been suggested to have multiple beneficial effects on recovery, including reducing delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and improving recovery after a strenuous workout.15


Carbon by Layne Norton Recover

View Product

Bodybuilding.com Platinum Series POST PROTOCOL

View Product

True GRIT Post

View Product

Most impressive, however, is that tart cherry has been suggested to improve recovery in resistance-trained individuals.16 Why is this important? Untrained people produce a lot of muscle damage, so they often respond better to supplementation with compounds that reduce soreness than trained individuals. It’s rare that a compound demonstrates the ability to support recovery in resistance-trained individuals, since they already recover at a faster rate than untrained individuals.

This means tart cherry supplementation could cut down the time it takes for you to recover from a workout, allowing you to perform your next one more effectively.* When the weights get heavy and the volume piles up, like in Phase 3 of my 13-week program PH3, that could make all the difference.

References
  1. Bhattacharya, S. K., & Muruganandam, A. V. (2003). Adaptogenic activity of Withania somnifera: an experimental study using a rat model of chronic stress. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 75(3), 547-555.
  2. Gupta, G. L., & Rana, A. C. (2007). Protective effect of Withania somnifera dunal root extract against protracted social isolation induced behavior in rats. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 51(4), 345-353.
  3. Wankhede, S., Langade, D., Joshi, K., Sinha, S. R., & Bhattacharyya, S. (2015). Examining the effect of Withania somnifera supplementation on muscle strength and recovery: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12(1), 1-11.
  4. Bang, H. S., Seo, D. Y., Chung, Y. M., Oh, K. M., Park, J. J., Arturo, F., … & Han, J. (2014). Ursolic Acid-Induced Elevation of Serum Irisin Augments Muscle Strength During Resistance Training in Men. The Korean Journal of Physiology & Pharmacology, 18(5), 441-446.
  5. Kunkel, S. D., Suneja, M., Ebert, S. M., Bongers, K. S., Fox, D. K., Malmberg, S. E., … & Adams, C. M. (2011). mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy identify a natural compound that increases muscle mass. Cell Metabolism, 13(6), 627-638.
  6. Maeda, H., Hosokawa, M., Sashima, T., Takahashi, N., Kawada, T., & Miyashita, K. (2006). Fucoxanthin and its metabolite, fucoxanthinol, suppress adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. International Journal of Molecular Medicine, 18(1), 147-152.
  7. Yonekura, L., Kobayashi, M., Terasaki, M., & Nagao, A. (2010). Keto-carotenoids are the major metabolites of dietary lutein and fucoxanthin in mouse tissues. The Journal of Nutrition, 140(10), 1824-1831.
  8. Abidov, M., Ramazanov, Z., Seifulla, R., & Grachev, S. (2010). The effects of Xanthigen in the weight management of obese premenopausal women with non alcoholic fatty liver disease and normal liver fat. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, 12(1), 72-81.
  9. Maeda, H., Hosokawa, M., Sashima, T., Funayama, K., & Miyashita, K. (2005). Fucoxanthin from edible seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida, shows antiobesity effect through UCP1 expression in white adipose tissues. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 332(2), 392-397.
  10. Kang, S. I., Shin, H. S., Kim, H. M., Yoon, S. A., Kang, S. W., Kim, J. H., … & Kim, S. J. (2012). Petalonia binghamiae extract and its constituent fucoxanthin ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity by activating AMP-activated protein kinase. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60(13), 3389-3395.
  11. Hu, X., Li, Y., Li, C., Fu, Y., Cai, F., Chen, Q., & Li, D. (2012). Combination of fucoxanthin and conjugated linoleic acid attenuates body weight gain and improves lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 519(1), 59-65.
  12. Hung, S. K., Perry, R., & Ernst, E. (2011). The effectiveness and efficacy of Rhodiola rosea L.: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Phytomedicine, 18(4), 235-244.
  13. Spasov, A. A., Wikman, G. K., Mandrikov, V. B., Mironova, I. A., & Neumoin, V. V. (2000). A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of the stimulating and adaptogenic effect of Rhodiola rosea SHR-5 extract on the fatigue of students caused by stress during an examination period with a repeated low-dose regimen. Phytomedicine, 7(2), 85-89.
  14. Parisi, A., Tranchita, E., Duranti, G., Ciminelli, E., Quaranta, F., Ceci, R., … & Sabatini, S. (2010). Effects of chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation on sport performance and antioxidant capacity in trained male: preliminary results. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 50(1), 57.
  15. Howatson, G., McHugh, M. P., Hill, J. A., Brouner, J., Jewell, A. P., Van Someren, K. A., … & Howatson, S. A. (2010). Influence of tart cherry juice on indices of recovery following marathon running. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 20(6), 843-852.
  16. Levers, K., Dalton, R., Galvan, E., Goodenough, C., O’Connor, A., Simbo, S., … & Riechman, S. (2015). Effects of powdered Montmorency tart cherry supplementation on an acute bout of intense lower body strength exercise in resistance trained males. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12(1), 1-23.
* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Bodybuilding.com Articles

From Overweight Teen To Model In One Year!

Christian was overweight for most of his childhood. When he moved out, he decided it was time to take responsibility for his own health.

Christian Clark remembers struggling with his weight as early as the first grade. His parents spoiled him by taking him out to lunch after school, and the calories began piling up. By second grade, he was noticeably bigger than the other kids, a trend that persisted into his teens.

“I always wanted to have that strong, muscular body, but I never thought that was something I needed to work toward,” he says. “I just kept thinking I would grow into losing weight.”

When Christian graduated from high school, he realized his bad eating habits weren’t something he’d just grow out of, so he took control of his body and lost nearly 100 pounds.

This is Christian’s story.

Did your family encourage healthy eating when you were growing up?

Healthy eating wasn’t particularly encouraged at home. When I started high school, my mom dropped 40 or 50 pounds with Weight Watchers. She tried to get my brother and me to start cleaning up our diets by packing our lunches and cooking at home, but our schedules were so hectic, that didn’t really last. I might have lost a little weight, but soon we went back to our bad habits and ate out all the time.

Before 260 lbs.

After 175 lbs.
Age: 18
Height: 6’1″
Weight: 260 lbs.
Body Fat: 30+%
Age: 19
Height: 6’1″
Weight: 175 lbs.
Body Fat: 10-11%

When did you start to realize your weight was an issue?

When I graduated from high school, I knew that I wanted to pursue operatic singing in college. Your voice may be at the forefront, but it’s still an industry where you’re judged by what you look like. While I was waiting to “grow into my fit body,” I kept getting bigger. I realized a change wasn’t going to just happen on its own, that it was up to me to make it happen.

What was your turning point or “aha” moment?

It came when I studied abroad in Spain for a semester. Out of all my friends, I definitely stood out as being the biggest. Being in a thinner culture was kind of a shock, too. It changed the way that I wanted to look. I realized that if I wanted to wear fashionable clothes and look the way everyone did in Spain, I had to lose weight.

I realized a change wasn’t going to just happen on its own, that it was up to me to make it happen.

What were the first changes you made to your diet?

I made changes slowly and didn’t really restrict anything. I began with healthier swaps; instead of having that second and third bowl of cereal for breakfast, I’d have one bowl with some orange juice and an apple. I was more careful about portion sizes, especially when it came to breads, pastas, and rolls—things we ate a lot of in my family. I didn’t cut them out, but I consciously tried to eat them in smaller amounts.

A photo posted by Christian S Clark (@sir_stokes10) on

How did you get into going to the gym and working out?

Initially, I didn’t have a trainer, but within my first few days of going to the gym, I met a guy who helped me with my workouts. He started talking to me because he could tell I was a newbie. He had the same issues I’d had growing up—just being a big guy. We started working out together when we could.

The same friend I was training with helped me figure out a meal plan. He got me started eating healthy carbs and fats and lean meats. I did a lot of research online, too. I followed some meal plans that I found on Bodybuilding.com, especially Ryan Hughes’ plans.

What did your meal plans look like?

Meal 1

Oats: 1/2 cup


Gaspari MyoFusion: 2 scoops


Meal 2

Lean ground turkey: 6 oz.


Broccoli: 1 cup


Almonds: 1/4 cup


Meal 3

Grilled salmon: 6 oz.


Broccoli: 1 cup


Meal 4

Lean ground turkey: 6 oz.


Broccoli: 1 cup


Almonds: 1/4 cup


Meal 5

Lean ground turkey: 6 oz.


Yams: 8 oz.


Meal 6

Gaspari MyoFusion: 2 scoops


Vitargo: 1 scoop


Meal 7

Lean ground turkey: 6 oz.


Broccoli: 1 cup


Yams: 8 oz.


Meal 8

Celery: 1 stalk


Peanut butter: 1 tbsp


What workout plan guided your transformation?

Day 1: Chest />
1

Barbell Bench Press, Medium Grip

5 sets of 15 reps

Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip

2

Incline Dumbbell Press

4 sets of 12 reps

Incline Dumbbell Press Incline Dumbbell Press

3

Dumbbell Fly

4 sets of 10 reps

Dumbbell Flyes Dumbbell Flyes

4

Straight-Arm Dumbbell Pull-over

3 sets of 15 reps

Straight-Arm Dumbbell Pullover Straight-Arm Dumbbell Pullover

5

Butterfly

4 sets of 12 reps

Butterfly Butterfly

Day 2: Quads and Calves />
1

Standing Calf Raise

3 sets of 60 reps

Standing Calf Raises Standing Calf Raises

2

Seated Calf Raise

3 sets of 60 reps

Seated Calf Raise Seated Calf Raise

3

Leg Extension

5 sets of 10 reps

Leg Extensions Leg Extensions

4

Barbell Squat

5 sets of 20 reps

Barbell Squat Barbell Squat

5

Leg Press

4 sets of 15 reps

Leg Press Leg Press

6

Smith-Machine Squat

3 sets of 15 reps

Smith Machine Squat Smith Machine Squat

Day 3: Back />
1

Wide-Grip Lat Pull-down

4 sets of 10 reps

Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown

2

Seated Cable Row

4 sets of 10 reps

Seated Cable Rows Seated Cable Rows

3

Bent-Over Barbell Row

4 sets of 8 reps

Bent Over Barbell Row Bent Over Barbell Row

4

Single-Arm Dumbbell Row

4 sets of 8 reps

One-Arm Dumbbell Row One-Arm Dumbbell Row

Day 4: Shoulders />
1

Standing Military Press

4 sets of 12 reps

Standing Military Press Standing Military Press

2

Dumbbell Bench Press

4 sets of 10 reps

Dumbbell Bench Press Dumbbell Bench Press

3

Barbell Shrug

4 sets of 15 reps

Barbell Shrug Barbell Shrug

4

Smith-Machine Shrug

3 sets of 12 reps

Smith Machine Shrug Smith Machine Shrug

5

Side Lateral Raise

3 sets of 12 reps

Side Lateral Raise Side Lateral Raise

6

Front Plate Raise

3 sets of 12 reps

Front Plate Raise Front Plate Raise

Day 5: Arms />
1

Barbell Curl

4 sets of 12 reps

Barbell Curl Barbell Curl

2

Dumbbell Alternating Dumbbell Curl

4 sets of 12 reps

Dumbbell Alternate Bicep Curl Dumbbell Alternate Bicep Curl

3

Standing Reverse Curl

4 sets of 12 reps

Reverse Barbell Curl Reverse Barbell Curl

4

Preacher Curl

3 sets of 12 reps

Preacher Curl Preacher Curl

5

Single-arm dumbbell extension

4 sets of 12 reps

Dumbbell One-Arm Triceps Extension Dumbbell One-Arm Triceps Extension

6

Weighted Bench Dip

4 sets of 15 reps

Weighted Bench Dip Weighted Bench Dip

7

Lying Triceps Press

4 sets of 12 reps

Lying Triceps Press Lying Triceps Press

8

Triceps Push-down

3 sets of 12 reps

Triceps Pushdown Triceps Pushdown

Day 6: Hamstrings and Calves />
1

Standing Calf Raise

3 sets of 60 reps

Standing Calf Raises Standing Calf Raises

2

Seated Calf Raise

3 sets of 60 reps

Seated Calf Raise Seated Calf Raise

3

Seated Leg Curl

4 sets of 12 reps

Seated Leg Curl Seated Leg Curl

4

Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift

4 sets of 15 reps

Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift

5

Dumbbell Lunge

3 sets of 20 steps

Dumbbell Lunges Dumbbell Lunges

Day 7: Rest />

How did you discover Bodybuilding.com?

I started researching weightlifting online and stumbled across the site. Then I went to town, reading everything I could find.

How did the site affect your transformation?

It was educational. Reading about other peoples’ transformations, seeing their workout routines, and learning how they were losing weight gave me new ideas and kept me motivated. I liked articles posted by trainers, too. I saw a video of Ryan Hughes and thought, “I want his body,” so I started doing his workouts and following his meal plans.

How did BodySpace help you along your journey?

I go there to post progress photos and see what other people are doing, especially regarding training and shows. Being able to follow people who are further along, and who can offer advice and answer questions I may have, is critical. I love that I can give back and do the same for those who aren’t as far along as I am. People are very supportive of each other, which is great.

Where there’s a will, there’s a way. It may not happen on the first, second, third, or even tenth try, but it will happen.

Did you suffer any setbacks?

I went on a ketosis diet that was high fat, moderate protein, and very low carbs. Coming off of that diet, I didn’t realize how careful I had to be with adjusting my macro intake. I had a friend who did years and years of clean eating, and his diet was pretty much sandwiches all the time, which really worked for him.

I tried that diet right after coming off that ketosis diet, and immediately, all that bread intake set me back. That messed with me psychologically a little bit. I think I gained about 10 pounds in two weeks. It was bad.

How did you overcome that?

I went right back to a balanced diet with only healthy carbs and hit the gym hard. In about a month or so, I had undone the damage, but I did come to realize one thing: The weight returns much faster than it comes off.

Has being fit opened new doors for you?

It’s definitely changed my life for the better. When I was growing up, everybody was into [the apparel company] Abercrombie & Fitch, but at my size, I wasn’t able to shop there. After I lost the weight, I got recruited to work there, just while I was walking on campus. I’ve even done some modeling for them. That’s obviously something I never could have done before. Aside from—and more important than—looks, I’m much healthier now.

Do you have any advice for others who might want to follow your lead and get fit?

Where there’s a will, there’s a way. It may not happen on the first, second, third, or even tenth try, but it will happen. There comes a time when you just want to be a better you, no matter what the reason. Once you light that fire, it will burn for the rest of your life.

Christian’s Favorite Gym Tracks

Beyoncé
“Get Me Bodied”
Miguel
“Hollywood Dreams”
Sylvan Esso
“Play it Right”
The Chainsmokers and ROZES
“Roses”
Beyoncé
“Get Me Bodied”
Miguel
“Hollywood Dreams”
Sylvan Esso
“Play it Right”
The Chainsmokers and ROZES
“Roses”

We Want Your Story!

Have you transformed your body by burning fat or building muscle? We want to tell your story. Send your before and after photos, plus a brief paragraph about your experience, to transformations@bodybuilding.com for a chance to be featured on Bodybuilding.com!


Bodybuilding.com Articles

鉄子出会い 中年出会い姫路 千葉

出会いを求めるサイトでは、やはり一意な出会いを…と狙いにする人はあまりいないかもしれません。本当に真正な出会いを探して成婚までと考えている人も活用していますが、やはりひとつかみのサイトの限定した人数でしょう。憂さ晴らし目的でサイトに入会している人がほとんどなので、登録するときはそれなりの意思は必要かもしれません。
中でも、男性で遊び気分でいる人の場合ですと、性的な営みをするだけを狙いとしている人もいます。こういう使用者のために、オトナ用のサイトというもので募集することが可能ですが、いつもの鉄子出会いであっても、セックス目当ての人が登録しているのです。
こんな男の人って、人妻に対して穏やかな言葉をかけたらすぐに肉体を重ねれると戦略を練っていますからね。人妻が性交したいから鉄子出会いにいるのだと推察していますからね。甚だしく誤想ですよね。
しっかりと、情事サイトというものが置いてあるのですから、セックス用途の男性はこのようなサイトで気晴らしして欲しいものですよね。多分野のサイトに登録するのは我慢して欲しいです。
それでも、そんな抗議を拝聴するような人なら開始から通常の鉄子出会いに登録することはないでしょう。淑女はこのようなセックス希望の男性が誘ってきたらスルーしても大丈夫だと思います。
通常なら、しっかりメールのレスポンスをするのが適切だと思いますが、このような類型の人間にリプライしたら繰り返しにメールを発信してきますからねどの場所か無関係に、疎ましい人はいるものです。
不愉快と理解したら、ウェブページをメンテナンスしているところに注進してみたらいいですよ。

半年ほど鉄子出会いをしてなかったのですが、またしても久々に遊びたくなって近頃再開しました。やっぱりサクラみたいなものがいるんですね。しかしもう引っかかりません。
昔実施していた時はなにもわからず、サクラの命令するままにリンクしてある箇所まで行ったりして、危機一髪で大金をはたいてしまうなどということもいつもでした。
この度も適度に遊んでくれるカワイイ子を必ず見つけたいと思ってます。女性はすぐに本当に会えるんですけど、少し合わなくて絶対に三ヶ月以上もたないことが多いです。
私は安直なんですよ。ですから出会い系などでなんとなくお付き合いすることができる子を探すようにしているんです。近頃はラインしている女の子が2人います。
明確に言って小生は容姿は良い方だと思うんですよ。ですので写メを送ればたいていの子が返事してくれるんですけど、一回ばかりになってしまうことがだいたいです。
話が下手くそなのかな。とは言ってもお金は我輩が出してますよ。旅館にも出向いたことがあります。小生と関係を持つまで及んだ女の子は、何度もセックスすることができるので、エッチのテクニックはそこそこだと思います。
ビシッと言うと美人な子とどういう話をしたらいいのかまったく理解不明なんですよ。弟にいわすと、女に話をするもんじゃない、女たちの話を黙って聞くもんだよと怒鳴られました。次会う女にはそのような風にやってみようと考えてます。

関連記事

  • 鉄子出会い 中年出会い姫路 千葉
  • 無料援助サイト 姫路市中高年出会い ツイッター
  • アダルト 援募 千葉援交
  • 地元で出会い 浜松市千歳出会いバー 千葉県
  • 姫路無料出会い系 援助交際したい サポ専用
  • 姫路で50代出会い系 1月出会い シングルマザー
  • 沼津サポ女 大人の出会いの場 姫路援助交際
  • 八戸市内援交 無料中年素人援助交際 貧困女子
  • 名古屋女装子出会い 当たった運命の出会い 月収
  • 南砺市出会い 中高年出会い 八王子

激安相場!ガチで会える援助交際掲示板ガイド

9 Healthy Cooking Tips You Must Know

Buying healthy food is only half the battle. You also need to cook it the right way! Here are the tips you need to prepare healthy meals.

If you’ve made the commitment to eat healthy this year, congrats! You’re doing something that will have huge, long-term benefits for your overall health and physique. The commitment to eat well, however, can be a little tough when you haven’t spent lot of time in the kitchen. If you don’t know how to cook, how are you supposed to eat healthy?

Don’t give up on your clean-eating resolution just yet! Six ultrafit MusclePharm athletes have come together to share some of their favorite clean-cooking tips. They’re not trained chefs—just people who have committed to living fit. Put their ideas into practice, and you’ll be eating more healthfully in no time.

Healthy Cooking Tip 1 Switch to a Spray

Cooking oils are a kitchen necessity, but they can be a little difficult to measure. “I tend to overpour oils,” says MusclePharm athlete Alyssa Smith. “I switched over to a cooking spray, which helped decrease the number of calories I was consuming.”

A photo posted by Alyssa Smith (@alyssalifts) on

If you usually douse your pan in oil before you throw in your chicken, try some spray instead. You’ll undoubtedly use less oil and ingest fewer calories. Smith’s latest favorite cooking spray is coconut oil.

This is a great choice for a cooking spray because it’s a healthy fat with great flavor and a high smoke point, meaning it can withstand high heat during cooking.

Healthy Cooking Tip 2 Try Salt-Free Seasoning

Many Americans consume far too much sodium. What with our reliance on fast food, frozen meals, and prepackaged snacks, it’s no wonder that people routinely blow past the recommended limit of 2,300 milligrams per day.

If you’ve already committed to a healthy nutrition plan and have cut out some of the sodium-laden foods mentioned above, your sodium intake is probably much lower than the recommended limit.

You can incorporate naturally sodium-free herbs like rosemary, garlic, and oregano for further flavor.

However, if you’re looking to take it to the next level, consider cleaning out your spice cabinet. Smith recommends using salt-free seasonings, which may come in handy if you’re preparing for a show or photo shoot, as you will have the most control over your daily sodium intake.

“There are a number of products that have lots of flavorful options, so you don’t have to be stuck with bland meals,” says Smith. You can also incorporate naturally sodium-free herbs like rosemary, garlic, and oregano for further flavor.

Healthy Cooking Tip 3 Shop for Sales

If expensive food is the primary reason your meals aren’t as healthy as they should be, you need a little lesson in grocery-store thriftiness. Clean eating doesn’t have to be pricey.

“Eating healthy can be much less expensive if you check your grocery store for weekly coupons, always buy in-season produce, and find food that’s on sale,” says Smith. Sure, being conservative with your hard-earned money might take a little extra work on your part, but that extra time translates into extra cash in your pocket.

Smith also recommends buying chicken in bulk and keeping it in the freezer. When you have the food on hand like this, you won’t have to visit the grocery store as often. Seek out grocery warehouses, if possible, to save big on big portions.

Healthy Cooking Tip 4 Load Up on Greens

One of the best ways to add healthy volume to your meals is to throw in some green vegetables. “Vegetables like broccoli, spinach, and kale add lots of micronutrients to keep you healthy and fiber to keep you full,” says fitness competitor and MusclePharm athlete Kyla Ford.

“Add a handful of spinach to your morning protein shake or afternoon meal,” she suggests. “It makes you feel like you’re eating more without adding a ton of extra calories.”

“Vegetables like broccoli, spinach, and kale add lots of micronutrients to keep you healthy and fiber to keep you full,” says fitness competitor and MusclePharm athlete Kyla Ford.

MusclePharm ambassador and cover model Noora Kuusivuori agrees: “More vegetables in your diet will help you stay hydrated and keep you feeling full while also providing essential nutrients such as vitamins A and K.

Even on my most strict contest-prep diets, I never limit the amount of green vegetables I eat. In fact, I tend to eat more when I want to lean out,” she says. “Some of my favorite ways to add these vegetables into my diet is to mix up a big salad at the start of the day or add some sliced peppers and onions to an omelet.”

MusclePharm: Combat 100% Whey

Ultra Premium 100% Whey!
Go Now!

Healthy Cooking Tip 5 Prepare Meals in Advance

Ford also knows that preparation is key to staying on track. Even if you’re busy, there’s usually a way to fit meal preparation into your day. “Take 1-2 hours 2-3 days a week to plan your meals ahead of time,” she says.

A photo posted by Noora Kuusivuori (@noorakuusivuori) on

“If you can’t answer the question, ‘What’s for dinner tonight?’ you need to work on your planning,” says Kuusivuori. “Decide on a week’s worth of clean-eating recipes so you don’t get stuck feeding the family a boxed meal containing processed or powdered who-knows-what. I like to do my grocery shopping and meal prep on Sundays so that those busy weekdays don’t throw me off.”

Ford and Kuusivuori agree that people who try to stick to a healthy nutrition plan without proper preparation are more likely to fall into their old habits, especially when they’re busy. If you’re serious about good nutrition, plan and prep some meals ahead of time!

Healthy Cooking Tip 6 Cook Efficiently

Cooking ample amounts of food to last you a few days is key to helping you stay on track. That’s why NPC bodybuilder and MusclePharm athlete Andre DeCastro turns to grilling. “It’s best to bake or grill your protein sources so you can cook a lot at one time,” he says.

“By preparing multiple servings of protein at one time, you know food is ready at your convenience, saving you time and money,” says DeCastro. All that’s left is to heat and eat!

“By preparing multiple servings of protein at one time, you know food is ready at your convenience, saving you time and money,” says DeCastro. All that’s left is to heat and eat!

Team Bodybuilding.com athlete and MusclePharm ambassador Raynor Whitcombe likes to decrease cooking time by cutting his chicken into smaller pieces and cooking them in olive or coconut oil. “As I cook, I set the heat between low and medium so the chicken is cooked without burning. I also add a sheet of foil over the chicken to keep the steam inside, which keeps the chicken tender and speeds up the process.”

Healthy Cooking Tip 7 Choose Food Straight From the Source

“Healthy eating is not just about how you prepare your food, but how you select it,” says record-holding weightlifter Derrick Johnson. Today, so many additives and chemicals are added to food before you see it. Johnson chooses grass-fed beef that is free of antibiotics, hormones, or added injections.

“Grass-fed meat tastes better and offers more omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed meat,” he says. Choosing organic or grass-fed options will provide you with a cleaner food right from the start.

Healthy Cooking Tip 8 Boil Eggs for Low-Fat Protein

Although a low-fat diet isn’t necessary for fat loss, some people prefer that approach. If you’re one of them, Whitcombe has a tip: “Eat hardboiled eggs.”

A photo posted by Raynor Aden Whitcombe (@kingaden88) on

“You won’t have to use any oil or butter to prepare them, and you can easily toss the yolks if you don’t want them,” he says. Without the yolks, eggs become a fat-free protein source. They’re also a fast and relatively cost-effective source of protein, so they’re great for any diet plan based on clean eating.

Healthy Cooking Tip 9 Add Healthy Fats the Smart Way

Even on a low-fat diet, getting enough healthy fats for your body to function properly is essential. “A lot of people are still holding on to the notion that eating fat makes you fat, but it’s not true,” says Kuusivuori.

She recommends eating healthy fats multiple times per day. “I like to top my salads with avocado or toss some walnuts or almonds into my stir-fry,” she says. For a clean snack, she likes to add coconut oil to smoothies or smear nut butter over a piece of fruit.

For All The Athletes

MusclePharm is dedicated to bringing its customers the most advanced supplement line ever developed. Go Now!


Bodybuilding.com Articles

The Ultimate Guide to Reverse Dieting

Eat less, work out more. It can work wonders for a while, but definitely not forever. When you can’t cut any more, it’s time to turn your diet around. Here’s how!

When most people decide they want to take control of their physique and lose some fat, the next step seems clear: Go on a diet. But honestly, not everyone should take that step.

For those with a history of crash dieting, severe calorie restriction, or multiple failed diet attempts, jumping once more on the diet bandwagon is unlikely to yield results, and will probably do more harm than good.

Over repeated bouts of calorie restriction, your metabolism takes a beating. When you drop calories too low for too long, your body intervenes on several fronts. Most notably, it reduces the number of calories you burn throughout the day, often priming your body for surprisingly rapid weight gain.

This biological phenomenon, known as “metabolic adaptation,” can really throw a wrench in your weight-loss goals. With your body continuously fighting to erase the calorie deficit necessary for fat loss, eating fewer calories than you burn can eventually become very tricky. You can only drop calories so far and increase exercise so much before that lifestyle becomes miserable, as well as impossible to maintain.

Fortunately, for anyone fighting an uphill battle against a slow metabolism, there may be a solution. It’s possible to reboot metabolism and ultimately lower what’s known as your “body-fat set point”—or the level of body fat your body finds easiest to maintain— through a process known as “reverse dieting.”

Here’s everything you need to know to get started with what may turn out to be the best diet of your life!

What Exactly is Reverse Dieting?

Reverse dieting is pretty much what it sounds like: a diet turned upside-down. Instead of cutting calories and ramping up time spent on the treadmill, you increase metabolism by gradually adding calories back into your diet while reducing cardio.

Although it sounds very simple, there’s more to reverse dieting than just “eat more, do less.” If you want to maximize gains in metabolic rate without storing a ton of body fat, you must be strategic and patient. This means giving your metabolism time to adjust by making slow, deliberate changes, rather than hitting the buffet every day and cutting out cardio overnight.

To grasp the science behind the theory of reverse dieting, you need to understand what happens in your body during metabolic adaptation.

Metabolic Adaptations From Dieting

When you drastically restrict calories or lose weight, your body senses the energy gap and your departure from its body-fat set point. In a desperate attempt to erase the energy gap and put the brakes on fat loss, several body systems work together to orchestrate a reduction in metabolism:1,2

  • Your organs consume less energy.
  • Your heart beats slower as sympathetic nervous system activity declines.
  • Hormones that influence metabolism and appetite, such as thyroid hormone, testosterone, leptin, and ghrelin, are adversely effected.
  • You burn less energy during nonexercise activities, such as fidgeting, walking around the house, working, and doing chores.
  • You use fewer calories to absorb and digest food because you’re eating less.
  • Your muscle becomes more efficient, requiring less fuel for a given amount of work.

These changes ultimately boil down to burning fewer calories, both at rest and while working out. This sounds bleak, but luckily, metabolic adaptation is not a one-way street.

You can slow down your metabolism, but you can also speed it up! This is what the concept of reverse dieting is built upon. Many of the physiological changes that work to slow metabolism during calorie restriction can occur in the opposite direction when overeating to make metabolism faster.1

You can’t just go on a pizza binge and expect metabolism to increase overnight. It takes time!

But you can’t just go on a pizza binge and expect metabolism to increase overnight. It takes time! This was demonstrated when researchers at Laval University in Quebec overfed 24 men by 1000 calories for 84 days.3 At first, almost all of the extra calories turned into fat or contributed to lean mass. By the end of the study, however, as each subject’s metabolism adapted, more and more calories were burned, rather than being used to create new tissue.

The moral of the story is that metabolism will speed up eventually to dispose of some of the extra calories you eat. But if you drastically increase calories before your metabolism has time to catch up, you’ll pile on the pounds.

A Reverse-Dieting Success Story

While the science supporting metabolic adaptation is sound, there is currently no definitive research on the actual process of reverse dieting. But this doesn’t mean that there aren’t plenty of people out there experiencing real-life success stories with reverse dieting. To help show you what this approach looks like in action—down to the macros—let’s meet one of those success stories. Her name is Katie Anne Rutherford.

As a high school track athlete, Katie Anne wanted to become as fast as possible. In her mind, this meant getting rid of any extra weight that might slow her down. Being thin was the name of the game. This mentality sparked an unhealthy relationship with food that would plague her for years.

To lose weight, Katie Anne began eliminating food groups and cutting calories. At her lowest, she was eating about 1,300 calories and running over 7 miles per day. Fruit, vegetables, and lean protein made up the bulk of her diet, while bread, sugar, and dessert were forbidden.

Feeling deprived, Katie Anne had a history of binge eating. Food became a source of comfort during times of stress, and she couldn’t seem to find balance. Alternating between eating hardly anything and eating everything, she was miserable.

Katie Anne’s diet struggles continued into college, where she started on a 1,500-calorie “standard” bodybuilding diet of lean protein and veggies. Paired with 90 minutes of cardio each day, she successfully lost 20-25 pounds a few different times.

Unfortunately, this success was never long-lived. Unable to stick to the diet, she gained the weight back each time. Living a life preoccupied by food, she had become a slave to her diet and the scale.

Unable to stick to the diet, Katie Anne gained the weight back each time. Living a life preoccupied by food, she had become a slave to her diet and the scale.

In 2013, Katie Anne came across two of Layne Norton’s YouTube videos: “IIFYM vs. Clean Eating” and “Metabolic Damage.” She realized that her metabolism had adapted to her restrictive eating regimen and excessive cardio routine. This motivated her to start “flexible dieting”; rather than restricting certain foods, she began engineering her diet around carbs, protein, and fat.

Although it was liberating to eat more than just lean protein and veggies, Katie Anne was still subsisting on low calories—a restriction that led to continued binging episodes. She was sick of the ups and downs and frequent urges to binge, and she felt as if she was being held hostage by a low-calorie diet that was difficult to maintain. At this point, she realized that a reverse diet with higher calories might help add some stability to her nutritional life.

In April 2013, Katie Anne officially began her first reverse diet. She started out eating 190 grams of protein, 200 grams of carbs, and 50 grams of fat (2010 calories) while lifting weights and doing four sessions of cardio per week. From there, she increased her calories quickly, adding 15 grams of extra carbs and 2 grams of extra fat each week, and reduced her cardio by half a session each week.

Choosing such an aggressive reverse diet quickly gave her more calories to work with, helping to reduce cravings and the urge to binge by allowing her to fit more food into her diet. She also felt better. Katie Anne focused more on becoming strong and healthy, and defeating her binge-eating habits. She never weighed herself during the reverse-dieting process.

In April 2014, at the end of her reverse diet, Katie Anne had gained 10 pounds and was maintaining this weight on 200 grams of protein, 375 grams of carbs (+175), 65 grams of fat (+15) (2885 calories, +875), and no cardio. She was able to gain strength and put on a substantial amount of muscle through heavy lifting, and had improved her relationship with food.

Katie Anne was able to gain strength and put on a substantial amount of muscle through heavy lifting, and had improved her relationship with food.

After training for a figure competition in November 2014, Katie Anne decided to reverse diet again. This time, she opted for a slower, more conservative reverse to minimize fat gain, starting at 180 grams of protein, 200 grams of carbs, and 52 grams of fat (1988 calories) while lifting weights and doing no cardio.

She increased carbs and fat by just 5 grams and 1 gram each week. By the end of the reverse, she hadn’t gained any weight and was eating 170 grams of protein, 320 grams of carbs (+120), and 80 grams of fat (+28) for a total of 2680 calories (+692) per day, and still not doing any cardio.

By the end of the reverse, Katie Anne hadn’t gained any weight and was eating 170 grams of protein, 320 grams of carbs (+120), and 80 grams of fat (+28) for a total of 2680 calories (+692) per day, and still not doing any cardio.

Today, Katie Anne has been binge-free for two years. She’s stronger and healthier than ever, and is maintaining a lean physique at 2400 calories per day—a figure that is 900 calories higher than when she was at her lowest body fat three years ago.

When done correctly, reverse dieting may reset your body-fat set point and allow you to eat normally and live again.

The moral of the story: When done correctly, reverse dieting may reset your body-fat set point and allow you to eat normally and live again. Here’s how to do it correctly.

How to Reverse Diet

Through reverse dieting and heavy lifting, Katie Anne harnessed the power of metabolic adaption to turn her body into a calorie-burning machine. You may be able to do this too by following these six steps:

1

Calculate your current calories and establish starting macro targets

To avoid jumping up in calories too quickly, you need to know how many calories you’re currently eating to maintain your body weight. From there, you’ll use this to establish baseline macros.

First, track everything you eat for a few days to determine your average caloric intake. Let’s say it’s 1,800 calories.

Second, set your protein target at 1 gram per pound of body weight. If you weigh, say, 150 pounds, your protein intake will be 150 grams of protein.

Third, subtract your protein calories from your current total-calorie goal to determine the remaining calories:

  • 150 grams of protein x 4 calories per gram = 600 calories of protein.
  • 1800 total calories – 600 calories from protein = 1200 remaining calories.

Take your remaining calories, and split them 40/60 or 60/40 between carbs and fat. These numbers can be manipulated, but either one of the above is a good starting place.

Let’s say in this example that you love carbs, so you decide to set carbs at 60 percent and fat at 40 percent of the remaining calories.

  • 1200 x 0.6 = 720 calories from carbs
  • 1200 x 0.4 = 480 calories from fat

To determine your macros, divide the carb calories by 4 and fat calories by 9.

  • 720 calories of carbs / 4 calories per gram = 180 grams of carbs
  • 480 calories of fat / 9 calories per gram = 53 grams of fat

You now have your baseline macros. In this example, they are 150 grams of protein, 180 grams of carbs, and 53 grams of fat.

2

Decide how quickly you want to increase carbs and fat

To figure this out, you need to ask yourself a few questions:

  • Do I care more about reaching a higher caloric intake than I do about gaining excess fat?
  • Am I trying to overcome a history of binge-eating behavior?
  • Am I planning to hit the weight room hard and add muscle while I reverse?

If the answer to any of these questions is “yes,” you may benefit from a more aggressive reverse. Although you’ll likely gain more body fat by increasing carbs and fat quickly, you’ll feel better and less deprived, you’ll have more flexibility to fit in the foods you crave, and you’ll be less inclined to binge. The extra calories that accompany an aggressive reverse may also give you more energy to train, allowing you to build muscle.

If you’re concerned about gaining body fat, you may benefit from a more conservative reverse. For example, if you’re coming off a reasonable diet where you reached your goal body weight, you may want to increase fat and carbs more slowly to better maintain your results.

3

Raise carbs and fat at a rate compatible with your goals

If you’ve decided that a slow reverse is more in line with your goals, start by increasing your carb and fat intake by just 2-5 percent per week, depending on how concerned you are with gaining weight.

If you’ve decided that a fast reverse is for you, you should start by increasing your carb and fat intake by 6-10 percent per week. You may even want to increase fat and carbs by 15-25 percent the first week to give yourself a jump-start.

If you’ve decided that a slow reverse is more in line with your goals, start by increasing your carb and fat intake by just 2-5 percent per week, depending on how concerned you are with gaining weight.
4

Weigh yourself multiple times per week to control weight gain

Choose 2-3 days per week, and weigh yourself first thing in the morning. Assessing your average weight change over the course of the week will help you evaluate your macro manipulations and decide on your next increase (if necessary).

If you see a large jump in weight gain over a one-week period, you may want to scale back the rate at which you’re increasing your intake. On the other hand, if you maintain your current weight, or even lose slightly, bump up both carbohydrates and fat.

5

Slowly reduce the time you spend doing cardio, and add heavy lifting to your workout routine

Lifting heavy 3-6 days a week is a great way to build muscle, which increases metabolism not only in the short term, but also over the long run. Long sessions of steady-state cardio do little to build muscle, and they may even interfere with muscle-building pathways.4

6

When you reach your desired caloric intake, stop and choose your next action

Once you’re satisfied with the amount of food you’re eating, stop adding calories and go from there. If you feel good, you may want to stay at this level. If you’d like to lose weight now that your metabolism is at a better starting point, go right ahead!

But be smart about how you go about it; don’t recklessly slash calories. You’ll want to diet on as many calories as possible while still losing weight. Your metabolism depends upon it.

If you need more guidance on reverse dieting, check out Layne Norton’s Avatar Nutrition for a customized coaching experience that adapts to your ever-changing metabolic demands.

References
  1. Rosenbaum, M., & Leibel, R. L. (2010). Adaptive thermogenesis in humans. International Journal of Obesity, 34, S47-S55.
  2. Levine, J. A. (2002). Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 16(4), 679-702.
  3. Deriaz, O., Tremblay, A., & Bouchard, C. (1993). Non linear weight gain with long term overfeeding in man. Obesity Research, 1(3), 179-185.
  4. Fyfe, J. J., Bishop, D. J., & Stepto, N. K. (2014). Interference between concurrent resistance and endurance exercise: Molecular bases and the role of individual training variables. Sports Medicine, 44(6), 743-762.


Bodybuilding.com Articles

One Woman’s Courageous Journey From Sick To Strong

Katelyn was a sickly child. But after surviving life-threatening surgery, she discovered a passion for fitness that paved her road to recovery.

From the time she was young, Katelyn struggled with debilitating stomachaches.

“I couldn’t hold food down,” she remembers. “People would make jokes—they’d say, ‘That’s just Katelyn. She just gets sick. She eats like a bird.’” In reality, it was something much more serious.

Sometimes the pain was so bad that Katelyn couldn’t even leave her home. She was in and out of the hospital and had so much trouble eating that doctors considered giving her a feeding tube for sustenance. Katelyn survived on the only thing she could keep down: protein shakes.

Doctors weren’t able to pinpoint what was wrong until Katelyn turned 17. “I blacked out, and they took me to the hospital,” she said. “That’s when it all began. That’s when they discovered the tumor.” Surgery to remove a large tumor from her midsection left the then 68-pound Katelyn facing a grueling, uphill recovery. She knew the key to getting her confidence—and her life—back was to make her body as strong as possible.

This is Katelyn’s story.

How did your doctors finally discover the tumor?

They did blood work, and because my white cell count was so high, they assumed it was cancer. An ultrasound revealed the tumor. But it wasn’t just any tumor; it was a dermoid tumor, which means that I absorbed my twin when I was in my mom’s womb. As I was growing up, so was the twin inside me. When they removed it, it had organs, teeth, and hair. It weighed about 10 pounds.

How long did your recovery take after the surgery?

I was in the hospital for a good three weeks after it was removed. Life after the surgery was not the same for me. I only weighed 68 pounds after the surgery, compared to 80 pounds before. I went back to school, but I isolated myself. I really only hung out with my family. I was terrified of myself—I couldn’t look in a mirror. I knew that getting healthy—and getting fit—would make me confident in myself again.

Before 68 lbs.

After 107 lbs.
Age: 18
Height: 4’10″
Weight: 68 lbs.
Body Fat: 10%
Age: 20
Height: 4’10″
Weight: 107 lbs.
Body Fat: 10%

What were some of the first changes you made to start getting fit?

At first, I just did cardio. I tried to run every day, but they weren’t long runs—maybe a mile and a half. I didn’t know anything about working out or nutrition, so I wasn’t eating well. I didn’t see the gains I should have, because my nutrition wasn’t where it needed to be. Still, exercising made me feel a lot better about myself.

What did you do to learn more about working out and eating well?

When I went away to college, a friend told me about Bodybuilding.com. I spent hours locked in my bedroom reading articles about weightlifting, nutrition, and transformations—anything I could find. It opened up new doors for me to start understanding things like healthy meal planning and tracking macros. It also inspired me to give weightlifting a try.

How did you start to incorporate weightlifting into your routine?

I was absolutely terrified of lifting weights in front of others at the gym, so I would go in the middle of the night with my laptop and work out by myself while I watched videos on Bodybuilding.com. Jamie Eason’s LiveFit Trainer was the first program I tried. I would watch her form and try to copy it exactly.

A photo posted by Kit-Kat Spalding (@kitkat_fitfreak) on

The guy at the front desk saw me and offered to help, so I started training with him. That gave me the confidence to start working out during the day. It was nice to go to the gym and know someone was going to be there to help me with form and give me tips on how to better myself.

When did you decide you wanted to compete?

There were articles on the site about women who compete, and that gave me the idea. I’m a competitive person, and it gave me some goals to work toward. I had gotten homesick at college, so I moved back home and started training for my competition there.

I met my trainer, Bryan, through my gym—some trainers recommended him to help me with my posing, and later, he started helping me with meal planning and my workouts. I eventually left my gym to join his, and that’s where I found my fit fam.

How did your trainer start getting you into competition shape?

In bikini, they look for that hourglass figure, so my focus was on my legs, glutes, and shoulders. I also did a lot of ab and core work to target the fat that built up around my midsection when I had the tumor.

What does your workout plan look like when you’re gearing up to compete?

Day 1: Shoulders, biceps and triceps />
Triset:

Dumbbell Shoulder Press

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Dumbbell Shoulder Press Dumbbell Shoulder Press

Barbell Curl

3 sets of 10 reps

Barbell Curl Barbell Curl

Triceps Press-down

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Triceps Pushdown Triceps Pushdown

Triset:
2

Dumbbell (or cable) upright row

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Standing Dumbbell Upright Row Standing Dumbbell Upright Row

Single-Arm Cable Curl

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Standing One-Arm Cable Curl Standing One-Arm Cable Curl

Triceps Kick-back

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Tricep Dumbbell Kickback Tricep Dumbbell Kickback

Triset:

Dumbbell Lateral Raise

3 sets of 10-12 reps

Side Lateral Raise Side Lateral Raise

Incline Dumbbell Curl

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Incline Dumbbell Curl Incline Dumbbell Curl

Dumbbell triceps extension

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Seated Triceps Press Seated Triceps Press

Day 2: Cardio />
1

Treadmill

30 min.

Jogging-Treadmill Jogging-Treadmill

Day 3: Lower body />
Superset:
1

Squat

4 sets of 8-10 reps

Barbell Squat Barbell Squat

Calf Raise

3 sets of 15-20 reps

Standing Barbell Calf Raise Standing Barbell Calf Raise

Giant set:
2

Leg Extension

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Leg Extensions Leg Extensions

Leg Curl

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Seated Leg Curl Seated Leg Curl

Abductor Machine

2 sets of 10-12 reps

Thigh Abductor Thigh Abductor

Adductor machine

2 sets of 10-12 reps

Thigh Adductor Thigh Adductor

Triset:

Stiff-Legged Deadlift

3 sets of 10-12 reps

Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift

Dumbbell Side Lunge

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Side Lunge Side Lunge

Seated Calf Raise

2 sets of 10-15 reps

Seated Calf Raise Seated Calf Raise

Day 4: Cardio />
1

Stationary bike

30 min.

Bicycling, Stationary Bicycling, Stationary

Day 5: Back, chest, and abs />
Superset:
1

Dumbbell flat press (or chest press)

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Dumbbell Bench Press Dumbbell Bench Press

Bent-over row (barbell, dumbbell, or cable)

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Bent Over Barbell Row Bent Over Barbell Row

Triset:
2

Incline press

4 sets of 8-10 reps

Barbell Incline Bench Press - Medium Grip Barbell Incline Bench Press - Medium Grip

Underhand Pull-down

4 sets of 8-10 reps

Underhand Cable Pulldowns Underhand Cable Pulldowns

Crunch

3 sets of 15-20 reps

Crunches Crunches

Triset:
3

Cable Cross-over

3 sets of 10-12 reps

Cable Crossover Cable Crossover

Dumbbell Pull-over

3 sets of 8-10 reps

Straight-Arm Dumbbell Pullover Straight-Arm Dumbbell Pullover

Hanging Knee Raise

3 sets of 10-15 reps

Hanging Leg Raise Hanging Leg Raise

Day 6: Cardio />
1

Stairmaster

30 min.

Stairmaster Stairmaster

Day 7: Rest />

What did you eat to maintain muscle while getting in shape?

Meal 1

Egg whites: 5


Whole eggs: 1


Onions: 1/2 cup


Peppers: 1/2 cup


Spinach: 1 cup


Meal 2

Chicken: 6 oz.


Green beans: 1 cup


Meal 3

Large salad


White fish: 5 oz.


Flax oil: 1/2 tbsp


Apple cider vinegar: 1/2 tbsp


Meal 4

Egg whites: 5


Whole eggs: 1


Onions: 1/2 cup


Peppers: 1/2 cup


Spinach: 1 cup


Meal 5

Chicken: 6 oz.


Spinach: 1/2 cup


Do you use any supplements?

Morning

BPI Best BCAA amino acids


Evlution Nutrition CLA


L-carnitine


Pre-workout

Cellucor C4


Whey protein


Noon

Evlution Nutrition CLA


Night

Evlution Nutrition CLA


Did you have any setbacks while you were training?

I went in for a follow-up a little over a year after my surgery and had an elevated kidney. I needed to go back to the clinic and immediately had déjà vu. I just broke down. I thought I was healthy. I was at the gym all the time and getting ready to compete. Luckily, when I got to the hospital, it turned out to be nothing. The scare was a huge setback though—it took me out of the gym for a few weeks.

I'm just a #gymrat Tomorrow is the big day! #showtime #bikinicompetitor teambeast #healthylifestyle #healthyliving #shelifts #shesquats #girlswithmuscle #fitspo #fitfreak

A photo posted by Kit-Kat Spalding (@kitkat_fitfreak) on

How long did it take to get ready to compete?

I started in June, and my first competition was in October.

Was everyone in your life supportive of your goal?

At the time, I was in a relationship. He told me he didn’t want to be with anyone who stood out. Obviously, I ended it there. That was the worst of it, though; my family was so supportive. I was very nervous to tell them about my desire to compete at first, because I didn’t want them to take it the wrong way—I didn’t know how my folks would feel about me being onstage in a bikini.

I had to explain to them that I wasn’t going up there to flaunt myself. I’m showing my hard work and my progress—how I went from a hospital bed to being a fit woman. It turned out I was worried for no reason; they were so supportive of my goals.

How did it go on the day of your first competition?

My prep the morning of the competition was a bit hectic. My spray tan spotted and looked terrible, so I went to the store and grabbed S.O.S pads. My mom helped me scrub my tan off and resprayed it, but at that point, I was already so upset. I just threw on a robe and got in the car. As I was driving, my fuel light came on. I was in really bad flip-flops and a robe, orange as can be from the tan, and I had to walk into a gas station. Needless to say, I got some looks.

I wasn’t expecting to place, but I ended up getting fourth. It was a very successful first show. It made me so excited to compete again.

After all that disaster, the competition itself was so easygoing. The girls backstage were a lot of fun. There was nothing stressful, and I wasn’t nervous that day. I just had a blast. I wasn’t expecting to place, but I ended up getting fourth. It was a very successful first show. It made me so excited to compete again.

What’s next for you? Do you plan to compete again?

My next show is in June, so I’m about seven months out. Even though I’m in the offseason, I’m still preparing. Right now is all about the lean bulk, which means I’m eating more calories than I would normally. It’s a really nice change after being unable to keep food down for so long—I welcome it with open arms! When I’m 16 weeks out from the show, I’ll start working on getting my body fat as low as possible.

What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

I would say my biggest accomplishment is starting over in life. I was able to finally discover what I love doing after being sick for my entire life. I had to start from nothing and teach myself. Going from that to being on a stage in a competition is my biggest accomplishment.

I want to show others that no matter what challenges they face in life, they can always get stronger. I’m in school right now, studying marketing and sales. Once I get the degree, I’d love to be a spokesmodel for a fitness company. I want to continue to inspire others and show them what’s possible.


Bodybuilding.com Articles

野田市出会い 男子援交責め 不倫

エッチが出来る友達を作りたいと思っているならお相手はどんな女性なのかと言う条件的なものがちゃんとしている方が効率的に探す事が出来るのではないかと思うのです。
一例としては、年齢層に幅を持たせるとか、住んでいるところはどこで、なんていうような必要最低限の希望の条件があるだけでも出会い系のサイトだったり、セフレ募集が出来るサイトのコンテンツ中にあるような検索機能で絞り込みをしていけるはずです。
それらにより絞り込んだ人の中でプロフの情報をちゃんと見て選んでいけば自分の理想的なお相手がきっと見つけられるでしょう。
でも、こういった細かい条件といいますか、自分の好みというのももちろん重要ですが、一番に重要な条件としては本気でその相手が相手としてふさわしいかどうかをしっかりとした見極めをしなければなりません。
セックスフレンドを作ると言うことは付き合う人にしてしまうと言う事にはならなくとも、肉体関係になるからには自然と深い友達になると言う可能性があります。なので、少なくとも相手も同じ感情でいてくれる事が大切です。
しっかり調べないと、もしもあなたが相手の女性の事をセックスフレンドのつもりでもその相手の女性の人はあなたに対して気持ちをもっているとしたらセックスフレンドな関係は成り立ちませんし、きっとどちらかが傷つくような結果になる可能性があるでしょう。

それなら一般的に野田市出会いといわれているものではいったいどの程度の出会いまでを経験するのでしょうか?状況によって変わりますが、早いときは1回目にメールをやり取りした相手と会えた事例も過去にはありました。
女性側か依頼を出してすぐにメールを出せば、そういったふうに発展する可能性が上がります。相手の情報をしっかり確認してからにしようと女性は思い込むので、長いスパンでコミュニケーションを続けましょう。
虚偽の内容では、当然良い結果にならないでしょう。やがてメールのみならず写真のやり取り等も増えるそうです。諸事情によりそこの時点で辞退を宣言されることも多いですが、このハードルさえ越えられれば、もっとお近付きになれる確率は一気に上がるそうです。
さりげない雰囲気で、趣味で共通点があれば声をかけるのも手です。ミュージシャンのライブ、ドライブなど、2人で共通した好みのものであれば不審に思われるようなことはありません。
店員との間にコネクションがあるなどの特権があるなら、もっと声をかけやすいですし、予定を取りやすいですね。それからは落ち着いた感じのお店で少しお酒でも飲みながら、次に会う予定についてなどを聞いてみてください。
「最初に連絡があったときはどんな印象だった?」など、ある程度のコミュニケーションを重ねたら質問してみるのも良いでしょう。そしてお互いに打ち解けるまでは男性がお金を出すのが一般常識といえます。
しかしながら女性がそれに対して不機嫌になっているのであれば、意固地にならずにお金を出してもらうべきです。借りを作るのに抵抗のある依存心を持たない女性もよく見かけます。

関連記事

  • 野田市出会い 男子援交責め 不倫
  • 男子援交 米子出会い系 即日入金
  • 余市出会い 今すぐ三河の女の子援助交際募集 女装掲示板サポ
  • 野外露出出会い 登録なしの出会い新潟県 石川
  • 援助不倫 長崎出会いBBS掲示板 熟年
  • 多摩 女装男子出会い 函館男性無料出会い
  • 札幌遊びたい子援助交際 男性無料出会い喫茶 中国人
  • 昼間 援交男子 福岡県出会いカフェ
  • 中標津町 50万援助希望 豊田市出会いクラブ
  • 素人妻 援助交際熟女体験 大分県竹田市出会い

激安相場!ガチで会える援助交際掲示板ガイド

Modern Physique Program Overview

You can either shape your body, or let yourself be shaped. Choose to tell a story. Choose to build your Modern Physique.

moderndropdown();

Main | Program Overview | Supp/Nutrition Overview | Training Overview | Get Started

Throughout human history, a man’s body told the story of how he spent his days, and what he did to survive. It was shaped by his surroundings, his needs, and his accomplishments.

You may have never met an ancient warrior, a nomadic hunter, or a laborer from the industrial revolution. But his story is still your story.

The men of the past hunted. Fought. Worked. Built. Muscle was their armor. It channeled his power through metal and stone. It was how he built his life, and protected everyone else’s.

Modern Physique Program Overview
Watch the video – 3:39

Today, a man’s body still tells a story—of a choice. Does he take inspiration from those who came before him, or wither before their challenge? Does he believe greatness is a thing of the past, or something that is still available to him?

You, the modern man, can choose to do nothing. You can let yourself be shaped. Or you can shape yourself and be strong, defined, athletic, aesthetic.

A man’s body says who he dreams of being, and what he’s willing to do to make it happen. Define yourself. This is the Modern Physique.

Make your history

What is the modern physique? Looking back at history, people didn’t train like we do today. There weren’t gyms to train in. Throughout most of history, people had physiques that were based around the jobs they had. It’s only been recently, in the last 100 years or less, that we’ve been able to choose what type of physique we want to have.

Today, people are more physique-conscious than ever. If you walk into any gym, it’s probably full. There are people doing biceps curls, people doing leg extensions, people working every type of muscle to its breaking point. Really, what they care about is their physical appearance. And that’s not bad. But there are more reasons to get to the gym.

There’s mobility. There’s strength. There’s power. There are multiple facets that need to go into a training program for it to be well developed. These layers of fitness are what set the modern physique apart.

Throughout most of history, people had physiques that were based around the jobs they had. It’s only been recently, in the last 100 years or less, that we’ve been able to choose what type of physique we want to have.

The Pillars of the Modern Physique

In this program, I’m providing you with eight weeks of training, nutrition, and supplement guidance. Your dedication to this program will take you from where you are now to that modern physique we all want.

I’ve developed this program so that each person will create a modern physique through eight pillars. They are:

  • Symmetry: This is similar to aesthetics. How balanced are you? Is your physique one-dimensional, or impressive from all angles?
  • Strength: Can you move a heavy weight safely, or do you just look the part?
  • Power: Can you make your muscles work together and express their strength quickly?
  • Flexibility/mobility: Are you a functional human being, or are you basically a muscular mannequin?
  • Endurance: Can you last in your workouts, sport, or life, or do you end up on the floor?
  • Muscularity: Have you put in your time to build quality mass? Do you have shape, or just size?
  • Definition: Are you lean enough to show that your diet is on par with your training?
  • Athleticism: Does your hard work in the gym carry over to other activities you care about?

I know these pillars work, because I use them in my own training. They’ve helped me build physique I have today. Each Sunday during the program, I’ll explain how the program will help you build one of these pillars.

I’m so excited about this trainer because it provides the opportunity to train in more than one method. You’re not just doing hypertrophy work. You’re not just training for strength. It’s about being a complete modern man, using what we know about training and nutrition to be better in all forms of fitness.

If you follow this program, supplement smart, and eat right, you’ll be stronger, you’ll be more explosive, you’ll have better symmetry and shape, you’ll be more muscular, you’ll have better definition, and you’ll be an overall better athlete.

There’s No Time like the Present

Where you go from here is up to you. If you’re ready to join me, make sure you watch the training overview and the nutrition overview to get everything you need to succeed.

Follow along every week to see each of my eight videos explaining the pillars of the modern physique. Also, track your program on BodySpace, and feel free to hit me up on Instagram or other social media with any of your questions. Just tag me, tag Bodybuilding.com, and use the hashtag #modernphysique.

This is your time. Define yourself!

Get the Most from Modern Physique

Supplements can help you build your best-ever body. Learn more about these hand-picked Modern Physique supps!
Go Now!

Main | Program Overview | Supp/Nutrition Overview | Training Overview | Get Started


Bodybuilding.com Articles

Modern Physique: Week 1, Day 5 – Upper Body and Cardio

Shoulders, back, chest, and arms—every bit of your upper body gets some work today. Don’t even think about cutting back. All this work is necessary to a modern physique!

moderndropdown();

Back | Main | Next

The giant set is a tough cookie, especially because it includes the close-grip bench press. Your front delts will feel annihilated. To do one, perform 10 reps of a regular dumbbell front raise, then 10 reps of a dumbbell lateral raise, and finish with 10 reps of a bent-over rear-delt row. All four exercises together equal one giant set.

On the dumbbell movements, select weight that you don’t have to put down. Your limiting factor will probably be the lateral raises. Trust me, you don’t have to go very heavy to feel serious burn.

Day 5: Upper body and cardio />
Giant set:
1

Close-Grip Bench Press

3 sets of 15-20 reps (Leave 2 in tank first 2 sets, go all-out on third.)

Close-Grip Barbell Bench Press Close-Grip Barbell Bench Press

Front Dumbbell Raise

3 sets of 10 reps

Front Dumbbell Raise Front Dumbbell Raise

Dumbbell Lateral Raise

3 sets of 10 reps

Side Lateral Raise Side Lateral Raise

Dumbbell Rear-Delt Row

3 sets of 10 reps

Dumbbell Rear Delt Row Dumbbell Rear Delt Row
Note: Rest 2 min.

Superset:
2

Pull-up

3 sets of 15 reps

Pullups Pullups

Single-arm overhead dumbbell shoulder press

3 sets of 15 reps

Dumbbell One-Arm Shoulder Press Dumbbell One-Arm Shoulder Press
Note: Rest 2 min. between supersets.

Gun show: Fail in the 6-rep range

Superset:
3

Barbell skullcrusher

3 sets of 6-8 reps (4-count eccentric)

Lying Triceps Press Lying Triceps Press

Barbell Curl

3 sets of 6-8 reps (4-count eccentric)

Barbell Curl Barbell Curl
Note: 90 sec. rest between all supersets.

Superset:
4

Alternating dumbbell Hammer Curl

3 sets of 6-8 reps

Alternate Hammer Curl Alternate Hammer Curl

Dumbbell skullcrusher

3 sets of 6-8 reps

Lying Dumbbell Tricep Extension Lying Dumbbell Tricep Extension
Note: 90 sec. rest between all supersets.

Superset:
5

Dumbbell Preacher Curl

3 sets of 15 reps (1-sec pause at top)

Two-Arm Dumbbell Preacher Curl Two-Arm Dumbbell Preacher Curl

Triceps Push-down

3 sets of 15 reps (1-sec pause at bottom)

Triceps Pushdown Triceps Pushdown
Note: Rest 1 min. between supersets.

Cardio:
6

Spin-bike sprints

10 rounds, 20 sec. work, 1 min. rest.

Bicycling, Stationary Bicycling, Stationary
Note: Add resistance for sprints, turn down resistance for 1 minute, but keep moving.

Get the Most from Modern Physique

Supplements can help you build your best-ever body. Learn more about these hand-picked Modern Physique supps!
Go Now!

Back | Main | Next


Bodybuilding.com Articles

The Surefire Way To Crush Your 2016 Goals

Serious athletes know that improvement doesn’t happen by accident. Here’s how to perform an inventory that will show you what’s truly holding you back!

Whether your goal is fat loss, strength, muscle, sport performance, or something else entirely, the preparation process involved is a system. By this, I mean it’s got a lot of moving parts, and if just one of those parts isn’t performing up to speed, the whole process suffers.

Think of it like a 12-station assembly line. If 11 of those stations are humming along at full speed, but one is jammed up, guess what? Your overall production comes to a screeching halt.

Training is a lot like that assembly line. For example, we’ve all heard expressions like “You can’t out-train a bad diet” and “There’s no such thing as overtraining, only undereating and undersleeping.” Regardless of whether or not you buy in to these statements, the underlying point is still true: Your overall training process will always be limited by its weakest link.

If you’re serious about results, you need to get serious about this process.

Your overall training process will always be limited by its weakest link. You need to get serious about this process.

The Power of Assessment

This a self-assessment tool I first started using with my martial arts students way back in my former life as a martial arts instructor: I’d have two students engage in a sparring match, and have each student rate themselves afterward on these attributes, using a 1-10 scale:

  • Defensive skills
  • Use of feints/indirect attacks
  • Use of counterattacks
  • Endurance
  • Use of combinations
  • Accuracy/targeting
  • Overall aggressiveness

After each student filled out their own inventory, I’d give them my ratings based on what I saw, right next to their own scores. In this way, my students could get a more objective assessment of their own abilities and a better handle on what they needed to work on in order to become a better fighter.

My students could get a more objective assessment of their own abilities and a better handle on what they needed to work on.

Not surprisingly, the greatest learning opportunities were in the areas where the student and my ratings differed the most. If they thought their counters were a strength, but I identified them as a weakness, that was definitely an eye-opener that stuck with them. I recommend this approach to you if you work with a trainer. But you can also do an effective version of it on your own.

Fast-forward to present day. I now use a similar assessment to identify and rate the various components that contribute to my own training process as I prepare for raw powerlifting competitions. It’s a simple four-step process you can use regardless of your fitness goals.

Step 1 Identify Training Factors

Kick off the process by compiling a simple list of every imaginable factor that contributes to your overall preparation process. Like any form of brainstorming, the key is to let those typing fingers fly. Don’t put too much analysis into this—just make that list. Just to get your imagination going, here are some things that have been on my list:

  • Training facility
  • Social support
  • Clarity of purpose (goals)
  • Skill level (technique)
  • Mobility
  • Training plan
  • Orthopedic health
  • Body composition
  • Hormone levels
  • Overall health
  • Financial stability
  • Life stress
  • Nutrition
  • Supplementation
  • Sleep quality/quantity
  • Symmetry (weak or underdeveloped muscles)
  • Training consistency
  • Psychological maturity
  • Training facility
  • Social support
  • Clarity of purpose (goals)
  • Skill level (technique)
  • Mobility
  • Training plan
  • Orthopedic health
  • Body composition
  • Hormone levels
  • Overall health
  • Financial stability
  • Life stress
  • Nutrition
  • Supplementation
  • Sleep quality/quantity
  • Symmetry (weak or underdeveloped muscles)
  • Training consistency
  • Psychological maturity

Now, if your goals are significantly different than mine, you might have items on your list that I don’t and vice-versa. You can also include more athletic-specific attributes than I did, such as cardiovascular endurance, work capacity, or absolute strength. That’s fine. Just compile your list and make it as complete and as detailed as possible. The longer, the better.

Step 2 Delete Factors You Can’t Influence

Once you’ve completed your list, remove any factors over which you have little or no control. In my own case, under the category of orthopedic health, my right knee has limited flexion due to surgical scar tissue from old surgeries. It’s certainly undesirable. However, it has no solution, so it’s not a problem.

Similarly, if you’re in prison (an extreme example, of course) you have little to no control over your training facilities, your nutrition, and most of the rest of that list. But you can still control your clarity of purpose.

Spend a few moments on your list, and simply cross out those items that aren’t within your control. If you’re not sure, leave them in for now. You can always remove them later.

Step 3 Rank Factors

This is the meatiest part of this process. It requires an honest willingness to take a cold, hard look at your situation and identify your strengths and weaknesses. Sometimes it’s not easy to be objective with this, so it might be helpful to enlist the help of a coach or a training partner to lend some objectivity to the process.

You can either assign a numerical ranking to the items on your list, or you can simply order your list starting with items that seem to be the most limiting, down to the items that appear to be the least limiting.

You can either assign a numerical ranking to the items on your list, or you can simply order your list from most limiting to least limiting.

Once you’ve ranked your list, earmark the “top” (meaning worst) 1-3 items for future attention. I wish I could be more precise than “1-3,” but honestly, everyone’s different. One person might really, truly be limited in a single area. If so, well, at least they know what they need to work on!

If you feel like you’re already working hard and you’ll have a difficult time shoring up your multiple weak points, you’re likely still better off limiting your efforts to one item at a time. If you’ve got a bit more maneuverability, perhaps you’ll be able to tackle 2-3 areas. Only you can answer this.

Step 4 Maintain Low-Ranking Factors, Improve High-Ranking Factors

Okay, you’ve made your list and ranked each item, and you’ve selected a few items for an improvement campaign. The next thing you’ll need to get comfortable with is the idea of putting at least a few of your strengths—or at least your nonweaknesses—on the back burner. This frees up enough time and energy to devote to shoring up your weakest factors.

As it turns out, this is a very worthwhile compromise. The things you’re best at can be maintained with much less work than it took to develop them in the first place. For example, using the example of maximal strength, you can maintain your one-rep max on core lifts with perhaps a quarter of the work that it took to reach them in the first place.

Also keep in mind that in most scenarios, just shoring up your weaknesses will improve your strengths. That’s a major point of this process, after all!

So diving into that specific example, if maximal strength is one of your strongest items, and work capacity is one of your weakest, simply improving your work capacity should improve your 1RM all by itself, even if you’re doing significantly less maximal strength training.

The things you’re best at can be maintained with much less work than it took to develop them in the first place.

When the Answer Isn’t So Clear

If, after spending time on your weakest areas, you don’t see an improvement in overall performance—and assuming you’ve given the process enough time to kick in—it simply means that your initial premise was mistaken. What you thought was a significant weakness probably wasn’t. This is when it’s time to get a second set of eyes involved.

Along the way, identify which factors, if improved, would simultaneously improve other factors as well. Example: A wide range of issues can often be improved through better nutrition. Overall recovery can be improved through smarter programming. Whenever you identify a weakness on your list, look to see if another item might be a root cause of that weakness.

Depending on your unique situation, it also may be worthwhile to further break down some of these categories. For example, perhaps your nutrition is fine, except that you don’t take in adequate protein. In a case like that, insufficient protein intake, not your overall nutrition, limits your progress.

Similarly, your overall mobility might be fine, with the exception of restricted hip flexors or shoulders. Unlock those two, and you might see a wide range of improvements.

Simplicity Is Underrated

Although the model of the “weakest link in a chain” is sometimes criticized for being too simplistic, in my mind, when dealing with complex topics like training, simplicity can be a valuable asset.

What’s really nice about this tool is that it works equally well for bodybuilders, powerlifters, weightlifters, CrossFit competitors—honestly, it can be applied to absolutely any goal with great results. Do some honest, fearless, introspective analysis on your situation, and treat your training like the important system it is!

Recommended Products For You


Bodybuilding.com Articles

TopCashback Love